Here I am , Lord

Sermon January 14 St Ambrose Aranui

Here I am, Lord

Today’s readings are about the theme of being called. Have you ever been in a busy place, and heard someone call your name? We’re hard-wired to recognise our own name, so we stop, and turn around, trying to see who is calling us, and if it is really us they want. It doesn’t often happen to me because my name is not very common. But when I hear a voice of a certain pitch saying, Mum! I react, along with quite a few other mums in the area. Our ears prick up, to see what is needed. Continue reading

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Sermon: Time

Sermon 16 Nov St Mary’s Whitby

Rev Felicity O’Brien

Christian stewardship is about our managing of those things God entrusts to us – how we take care of resources so that they will be put to good use, and not wasted. It involves giving back to God a proportion of our income, time and talents, and how we do this reflects his place in our lives.In the first address on the stewardship of wealth, Tim pointed us to the Biblical principal of tithing – ie giving to God a tenth of our income ; a principle God laid down as the proper stewardship for his people in the Old Testament. Or you could put it the other way – tithing involves keeping 90% of our money, talents and time!Last week Ralph addressed the stewardship of gifts and talents.He pointed out how everyone has their own God-given talent, for example painting, music, mercy, hospitality and the like. Add to that the spiritual gifts that we have as Christians, which Paul tells us are for the proper functioning of the Church.Ralph concluded his address with an appeal for us to consider where each of us are presently – or could be – using our gifts and talents to serve God in this parish.

Time is the third resource that we are considering in this series about stewardship of God’s gifts to us. It’s not like money or talent, where the amount we have differs widely from one person to another. We each have the same number of hours in the day. 24 hours, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year. How many years we have, well, that’s where it is limited, at least here on earth. Our time in heaven is infinite, so we really have a lot of time! Continue reading

Sermon: We can talk to God

St Mary’s Whitby 28 September 2014

Exodus 17:1-7, Phil 2:1-13, Matt 21:23-32

There is a theme in our readings that links the story of Moses and the Israelites in the wilderness with the Pharisees questioning Jesus over where he gets his authority.

The Israelites are grumbling that there is no water. They tend to get a bit of a bad rap when so many of the accounts of the wilderness days are about how they are never happy, but let’s put ourselves into their shoes for a minute. They had been led out of Egypt, putting all their trust in an elderly shepherd who had turned up out of nowhere, speaking their language. They had been led through the sea, and they had seen Moses part that sea by raising his staff. So on the one hand they knew that their leader was someone special, who could do the miraculous things, or rather, a channel through whom God could deliver them. Continue reading

Sermon: Noticing

Sermon. 31 August 2014
Rev Felicity O’Brien
St Mary’s Whitby
Exod 3:1-15, Rom 12:9-21, Matt 16:21-28

Moses was a man who noticed things. Maybe this was to do with his upbringing – at first he was raised by his mother, in the Hebrew culture, and then he was returned to the princess who had adopted him when she took him out of the river. Imagine how different life would be at the court of Pharaoh for the young boy – he would have had to watch carefully to learn what to do, how to behave, even learn a new language. He was educated in all the Egyptian ways, and learnt a great deal. Continue reading

Sermon: Moses, the truth and following God

Moses, the truth, and following God.

St Anne’s Porirua 24 August 2014
Exodus 1:8-2:10
Rom 12:1-8
Matt 16:13-20
The story of Moses in the bulrushes is a favourite from Sunday school isn’t it? The little baby, vulnerable in his cradle of reeds, set afloat on the river. It’s got all the features of a good story – there is tension and resolution. We worry about the child, but we know he will be ok.
But let’s back up the story a bit, to look at why this wee fellow was set afloat.
The Hebrew people were growing strong in the land. This is the same group of people that we heard about in readings from the last two weeks – Joseph’s family. Remember how they came out of famine into Egypt, to survive because of Joseph’s prudence. But we come forward a few generations, till the ruler in charge of Egypt no longer remembers Joseph and what he did for Egypt. Now there is just an annoying racial minority group in the land, who seem to pose a threat to the Egyptians. Continue reading